IIWP Board Member John Morton presented the following seminar at the Gathering of Peacemakers event on July 1, 2004 in Universal City, California. Before the seminar began, John gave a blessing—an invocation for the July 1st to August 1st 32-Day Worldwide Peace Prayer. During the blessing those present were asked to visualize particles of peace from the source of peace coming in and going out on their breath, and to hear the words, “God Bless You. I Love You. Peace. Be Still,” spoken so that they could be heard all at once across the planet. At the beginning of the seminar John invited everyone to repeat out loud his words, “God Bless You, I Love You. Peace. Be Still” every time he spoke them. Now you are invited—once again or for the first time—to experience and enjoy this peace process. Each time you read John’s words, “God Bless You, I Love You. Peace. Be Still,” pause for a moment and visualize particles of peace coming into you and then radiating out from you, as you repeat these words to yourself. . .

Are You a Peacemaker?
By John Morton

When I was doing the visualization earlier related to the 32 day Peace Prayer, I saw something I remember first seeing in “Bambi,” the movie about the deer in the forest. During Bambi’s life there was a fire. What I remember that struck me was that all the animals were in some way attentive to the alarm, the severity or emergency in the situation. What I remember was a kind of pitched awareness, the ears went up and all the heads turned simultaneously and there was a looking, like on the horizon or into the distance. I was seeing something like this for: God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.

Pause, and repeat to yourself: God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

I was visualizing these words could be heard all around the world at once. That’s an amazing thought, isn’t it? What kind of voice could do that so that everyone and everything would hear: God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still?

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

John-Roger has referred to them as nine magic words. And I’m sure, indeed, they are, if we have the ears to hear.

There are situations that we judge and we decide, “Well that’s not worthy of my good response. That deserves my damn response, or my upset response. I don’t like that. I don’t like them. They shouldn’t do that.”

What difference would it make if we changed that so that we determined ourselves not to be upset and instead just responded in a way where we took care of it somehow? Imagine if somebody ran into you with their car. You were obeying the traffic laws, so they were not in the right of way. Could you find it in yourself to take care of them even though they didn’t deserve it? The law would say, “I could sue you for that. I could even have you arrested if it was really serious.” But instead, I could also choose to respond in a compassionate way. “God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.”

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

The next time we say those words, let them go out to anybody you’ve ever offended, if you please, and listen to your heart. Listen to your heart and how it speaks, how it carries those words on your voice. And imagine it’s up to you to let them go. Will you let those words go to anyone who has offended you? Even from a distance? Maybe the only way you met them was on TV or in the newspaper, or in an article, or what somebody else told you. Rather than let yourself be offended and carry that as a consciousness inside of you, there is an opportunity to utter those words in such a way as they go out to whoever has offended you. God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.
[Listen to your heart and how it carries those words.]

There is a wonderful book that is real simple called “Loving Each Day for Peacemakers,” that presents a number of teachings and little challenges that John-Roger has brought forward over the years. “Loving Each Day for Peacemakers” demonstrates how every day we can do something more than pray for peace. We can bring into consideration that every moment of every day each one of us has the opportunity to be a peacemaker. Well, that is, of course, if we are peacemakers.

Are you a peacemaker?

Someone’s listening.

Are you a peacemaker?

Page 80 and 81 of this wonderful little book states, “You can be at peace with yourself and still let other people know that they are hurting you.” Is that news for anybody here? Maybe. I’m going to own it for the dumb part of me that still needs to learn that I can be at peace with myself and let other people know that they’re hurting me. It would be something really important for my children to learn. If there’s something that I’m doing that hurts, at any level, it would be nice to know how to let others know about that and still be at peace.

“Remain at peace with yourself. You take authority over what’s going on with you by acknowledging it. If your authority is that of peace, you bring peace into the situation.” So I have a question before I even get to John-Roger’s question: Is your authority that of peace? Do you claim that? Do you fully claim it? That would mean that in every situation you find yourself, you have the authority of peace. You can stand up and say, “Peace. Be still.”

Peace. Be still.

Here’s J-R’s question on page 81. “Where do I currently hurt? Physically, emotionally, mentally, etc. How can I acknowledge that hurt without judgment, worry, or concern?” Can you see that peace is an applied process? If you are a peacemaker, it’s not just a title on your door somewhere. Perhaps on your business card you might consider adding P period, M period. At least get someone to say, “What’s P.M.?”

“Peace Maker.”

Then when they’re looking at you curiously you can say, “God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.”

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

On page 186: “Many people find themselves searching endlessly for sensation out in the world in order to avoid...” I have found myself searching endlessly for sensation out in the world. And here comes the good part, “in order to avoid”. What do you suppose we’re trying to avoid? “…facing the hurt, anger, upset that they find when they turn inside to find peace.” I’d better read that again. Some part of me didn’t quite get it. “Many people find themselves searching endlessly for sensation out in the world in order to avoid facing the hurt, anger, and upset they find when they turn inside to find peace.” I think that’s a little warning that when you turn inside to find peace beware that you may also face the hurt, anger, and upset. And then there’s a reaction to turn toward the world to somehow take care of that.

“Many people don’t know that their peace lies beyond their pain.” Give yourself a chance right now to find the peace beyond the pain. And if you know anybody in pain, you can extend this to them as a prayer, as how you see them. Can you see somebody who’s in pain, and then see them change so they’re beyond the pain?

On page 2, “Heart to heart healing is the goodness of one heart moving and touching another heart.” Heart to heart healing is the goodness. So if there’s any badness, that’s not it, folks. It’s the goodness of one heart moving and touching another heart, which can remove hurts, regrets, and envies. Would you like to have your hurts, regrets, and envies removed? “This other heart will then come forward and touch back to the first heart, and these hearts will start to heal each other.” So, it just takes one heart. “That is why I say, peace starts first with you. Then it becomes contagious.”

Here’s the questions: “When have I experienced heart to heart healing? What did the other person or I do to facilitate that experience?”

This question brings us right back where we started. Maybe it bears repeating. “Where do I currently hurt? Physically, emotionally, mentally, etcetera? How can I acknowledge that hurt without judgment, worry, or concern?” Imagine if that was the key, that you would respond to your hurt without judgment, without worry, without concern. When’s the last time you did that? Maybe it’s been a while.

Perhaps you could just find the hurt that you somehow carry. Even hurt that you don’t realize or that you do your best to avoid. Maybe especially that hurt. And if you would look upon it without worry, without concern, without judgment, it would let go. And here comes the magic voice: God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

So let us up-level however we’re playing as peacemakers. Simply consider whatever you could do right now to adjust your consciousness to be free of judgment. It doesn’t matter which kind, yours or others. Just be free of it. Consider that you have that button to push to be free of any worry.

See if you can lay on your consciousness to make a decision, a commitment that you’re going to be okay with whatever it is. Even if you somehow manage to forget and not act like it’s okay, you remember, oh yes, I’m the one who makes it okay. I’m not the one who throws a tantrum and makes everybody miserable in the process. I’m the one who stops that and hears the voice and speaks that voice: God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

Here’s an interesting exercise. Let’s consider that for this extended moment, if we can manage to be quiet, to be still, that peace will extend itself. So the peace that is beyond what we can do, beyond our choice can come forward because we are quiet and still and we hold for the peace while all the rest of the world is in whatever motion it is in.

There’s a principle that has to do with how pendulums work, particularly the pendulums that are in clocks that go back and forth and keep time. If you put a group of pendulums into the same room, after a while they’ll all be in rhythm. Maybe those pendulums know something—that there’s something about coming into the presence of another and just being with the other that eventually leads to harmony.

And perhaps that way is prepared in the quiet, in the willingness to listen to somebody, to take them in for who they are. So here goes our moment of peace . .

[Hold in the stillness of this moment]

The next time you’re in a dark room or maybe just in a place where you feel alone, consider that you’re not alone. There’s just a group of peacemakers being silent in your presence. God bless you. I love you. Peace. Be still.

God Bless You. I love you. Peace. Be still.

Baruch Bashan


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